Amino Acids

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 263–269 | Cite as

Free D- and L-amino acids in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid from Alzheimer and normal subjects

  • G. Fisher
  • N. Lorenzo
  • H. Abe
  • E. Fujita
  • W. H. Frey
  • C. Emory
  • M. M. Di Fiore
  • A. D'Aniello
Full Papers

Summary

Free D-Ser, D-Asp and total D-amino acids were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in Alzheimer (AD) ventricular CSF than in normal CSF. There was no significant difference in the total L-amino acids between AD and normal CSF, but L-Gln and L-His were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in ADCSF. The higher concentrations of these D- and L-amino acids in AD ventricular CSF could reflect the degenerative process that occurs in Alzheimer's brain since ventricular CSF is the repository of amino acids from the brain.

Keywords

D- and L-Amino acids Cerebrospinal fluid Ventricular CSF Alzheimer's disease 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Fisher
    • 1
  • N. Lorenzo
    • 1
  • H. Abe
    • 2
  • E. Fujita
    • 3
  • W. H. Frey
    • 4
  • C. Emory
    • 4
  • M. M. Di Fiore
    • 5
  • A. D'Aniello
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryBarry UniversityMiami ShoresUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of Marine Biochemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural Life ScienceThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Food Science and NutritionKyoritsu Women's UniversityTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Alzheimer's Treatment and Research CenterHealth Partners Foundation, St. PaulMinnesotaUSA
  5. 5.Department of Life ScienceSecond University of NaplesCasertaItaly
  6. 6.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyStazione Zoologica “A Dohrn”NapoliItaly

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