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Vegetation History and Archaeobotany

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 133–146 | Cite as

Early crop diversity: A “new” glume wheat from northern Greece

  • Glynis JonesEmail author
  • Soultana Valamoti
  • Michael Charles
Article

Abstract

At three Neolithic sites and one Bronze Age site in northern Greece, spikelet bases of a “new” type of glume wheat have been recovered. These spikelet bases are morphologically distinct from the typicalTriticum monococcum L. (einkorn),T. dicoccum Schübl. (emmer) andT. spelta L. (spelt) types previously recorded from Greece and they have also been observed at Neolithic and Bronze Age sites in Turkey, Hungary, Austria and Germany. their taxonomic identification remains uncertain but it seems likely that they are tetraploid, and they have morphological features in common withT. timopheevi Zhuk. Various possibilities exist for the origin of this type but, whatever its origin and exact identity, its cultivation has ceased over large geographical areas since the Bronze Age. At the northern Greek sites, at least, the new type may have been cultivated as a maslin (mixed crop) with einkorn.

Key words

Archaeobotany Glume wheat Triticum timopheevi Greece 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glynis Jones
    • 1
    Email author
  • Soultana Valamoti
    • 1
  • Michael Charles
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Archaeology and PrehistoryUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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