Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 36, Issue 8, pp 1084–1088

Seroepidemiology ofHelicobacter pylori infection in India

Comparison of developing and developed countries
  • David Y. Graham
  • Ervin Adam
  • Gurunath T. Reddy
  • Jai Prakash Agarwal
  • Rohit Agarwal
  • Doyle J. EvansJr.
  • Hoda M. Malaty
  • Dolores G. Evans
Original Articles

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori (previouslyCampylobacter pylori) is now accepted as the major cause of type B gastritis and thus what is known about the epidemiology of type B gastritis can reasonably be transferred toH. pylori. We used a specific ELISA for anti-H. pylori IgG to study the prevalence ofH. pylori infection in a population of lower socioeconomic class from Hyderabad, India. The results from India were compared to studies from other parts of the world. Two hundred thirty-eight individuals ages 3 to 70 participated. The frequency ofH. pylori infection increased with age (P<0.01) and was >80% by age 20.H. pylori infection was present in 79% of the population studied; there was no gender-related difference in prevalence ofH. pylori infection. IgG antibody against hepatitis A (HAV) was rapidly acquired in Hyderabad; in a subset of 58 children between the ages of 3 and 21 tested, the frequency of anti-HAV was 98.2%. The prevalenc ofH. pylori infection increases with age in both developed and developing countries. The high age-specific prevalence ofH. pylori infection in developing countries is probably a reflection of the lower socioeconomic level of those areas.

Key Words

Helicobacter pylori seroepidemiology race age-specific socioeconomic group hepatitis A 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Y. Graham
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ervin Adam
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Gurunath T. Reddy
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jai Prakash Agarwal
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Rohit Agarwal
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Doyle J. EvansJr.
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hoda M. Malaty
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Dolores G. Evans
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Medicine and Division of Molecular VirologyVeterans Affairs Medical Center and Baylor College of MedicineHouston
  2. 2.Deccan Pathological InstituteOsmania General HospitalHyderabadIndia
  3. 3.Niloufer HospitalHyderabadIndia

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