Digestive Diseases and Sciences

, Volume 37, Issue 9, pp 1362–1367 | Cite as

Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein as a sensitive marker of intestinal ischemia

  • Tatsuo Kanda
  • Yasuo Nakatomi
  • Hiroyuki Ishikawa
  • Masahiro Hitomi
  • Yoichi Matsubara
  • Teruo Ono
  • Terukazu Muto
Original Articles

Abstract

Determination of the serum level of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein has been used to detect rat intestinal ischemia following ligation or 30-min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. The normal values were under the minimal detectable level of less than 2 ng/ml in all the 10 rats. The serum fatty acid-binding protein level increased rapidly, to 340.7±54.6, 438.5±40.1, 388.1±37.4, and 292.2±95.7 ng/ml (P<0.01) at 1, 2, 4, and 8 hr after ligation respectively. It also increased, to 347.2±127.7 ng/ml (P<0.01) at 1 hr, after a 30-min transient occlusion and then returned to a normal level. Histological studies showed destruction of the villi, disappearance of the mucosa, and transmural necrosis with the progress of time after ligation, while no remoarkable morphological change was observed following 30-min transieent occlusion. These observations strongly suggest that the intestinal fatty acid-binding protein is a useful biochemical marker for intestinal ischemia, particularly in the early reversible phase.

Key words

fatty acid-binding protein serum marker intestinal ischemia superior mesenteric artery enzyme immunoassay 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Williams LF: Mesenteric ischemia. Surg Clin North Am 68:331–353, 1988Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Takahashi K, Odani S, Ono T: Prinmary structure of rat liver Z-protein. FEBS Lett 140:63–66, 1982Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Kimura H, Hitomi M, Odani S, Koide T, Arakawa M, Ono T: Rat heart fatty acid-binding protein. Biochem J 260:303–306, 1989Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Alpers DH, Strauss AW, Ockner RK, Bass NM, Gordon JI: Cloning of a cDNA encoding rat intestinal fatty acid-binding protein. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 81:313–317, 1984Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ockner RK, Manning JA: Fatty acid-binding protein in small intestine. J Clin Invest 54:326–338, 1974Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Sacchettini JC, Gordon JI, Banazak LJ: Crystal structure of rat intestinal fatty acid-binding protein. J Mol Biol 208:327–339, 1989Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kanda T, Iseki S, Hitomi M, Kimura H, Kondo H, Matsubara Y, Muto T, Ono T: Purification and characterization of fatty acid-binding protein from the gastric mucosa of rats. Possible identity with heart FABP and its parietal cell localization. Eur J Biochem 185:27–33, 1989Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Kanda T, Odani S, Tomoi M, Matsubara Y, Ono T: Primary structure of a 15-kDa protein from rat intestinal epithelium. Sequence similarity to fatty acid-binding protein. Eur J Biochem 197:759–768, 1991Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Shields HM, Bates ML, Bass NM, Best CJ, Alpers DH, Ockner RK: Light microscopic immunocytochemical localization of hepatic and intestinal types of fatty acid-binding proteins in rat small intestine. J Lipid Res 27:549–557, 1986Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Iseki S, Kanda T, Hitomi M, Ono T: Ontogenic appearance of three fatty acid-binding proteins in the rat stomach. Anat Rec 229:51–60, 1991Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Graeber GM, Wolf RE, Harmon JW: Serum creatine kinase and alkaline phosphatase experimental small bowel infarction. J Surg Res 37:25–32, 1984Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Kanda T, Ono T, Matsubara Y, Muto T: Possible role of rat fatty acid-binding proteins in the intestine as carriers of phenol and phthalate derivatives. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 168:1053–1058, 1990Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Thompson JS, Bragg LE, West WW: Serum enzyme levels during intestinal ischemia. Ann Surg 211:369–373, 1990Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Lobe TE, Bokin EE, Rassin DK, Gourley WK, Oldham KT, Bhatia J: Hexosaminidase. A marker for healing after ischemic gut injury. J Surg Res 40:362–367, 1986Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Willin A, Navert H, Bonous G: Effect of intestinal ischemia on diamine oxidaase activity in rat intestinal tissue and blood. Gastroenterology 80:349–355, 1981Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Marks WH, Salvion C, Newwell K, Wider M, Marks C: Circulating concentrations of porcine ileal polypeptide but not hexosaminidase are elevated following 1 hr of mesenteric ischemia. J Surg Res 45:134–139, 1988Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Borgstrom A, Wider M, Marker W, Lloyd R, Herman G, Vinik A: Immunohistochemical localization of a specific ileal peptide in the pig. Histochemistry 86:101–105, 1986Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Menge H, Robinson JWL: Early phase of jejunal regeneration after short term ischemia in the rat. Lab Invest 40:25–30, 1979Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Khanna SP: An experimental study of mesenteric occlusion. J Pathol Bacteriol 77:575–590, 1959Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Bass NM, Manning JA, Ockner RK, Gordon JI, Seetharam S, Alpers DH: Regulation of the biosynthesis of two distinct fatty acid-binding proteins in rat liver and intestine. J Biol Chem 260:1432–1436, 1985Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Ockner RK, Manning JA: Fatty acid-binding protein in small intestine. J Clin Invest 54:326–338, 1974Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    O'Brien JS, Okada S, Chen A, Fillerup DL: Tay-Sachs disease. Detection of heterozygotes and homozygotes by serum hexosaminidase assay. New Engl J Med 283:15–20, 1970Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Jemmerson R, Low MG: Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase. Biochemistry 26:5703–5709, 1987Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Aho AJ, Ahonen J, Inberg MV, Scheinin TM: Ultrastructural alternations in ischemic lesions of small intestinal mucosa in experimental superior mesenteric occlusion. Scand J Gastroenterol 8:439–447, 1973Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Sweetser DA, Brinkenmeier EK, Keliska IJ, Zollman S, Sparkes RS, Mohandas T, Lusis AJ, Gordon JI: The human and rodent intestinal fatty acid binding protein gene. A comparative analysis of their structure, expression and linkage relationships. J Biol Chem 262:16060–16071, 1987Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tatsuo Kanda
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yasuo Nakatomi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hiroyuki Ishikawa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Masahiro Hitomi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yoichi Matsubara
    • 1
    • 2
  • Teruo Ono
    • 1
    • 2
  • Terukazu Muto
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryNiigata University School of MedicineNiigataJapan
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryNiigata University School of MedicineNiigataJapan

Personalised recommendations