Protoplasma

, Volume 213, Issue 3–4, pp 148–156

Immunolocalization of glucomannans in the cell wall of differentiating tracheids inChamaecyparis obtusa

  • Yukihisa Maeda
  • Tatsuya Awano
  • Keiji Takabe
  • Minoru Fujita
Original Papers

Summary

A polyclonal antibody against glucomannans (GMs) was raised in a mouse. A dot-blot immunoassay and competitive-inhibition tests indicated that the antibody was specific for GMs. The antibody enables visualization of the localization of GMs in differentiating tracheids ofChamaecyparis obtusa. Labeling of GMs was restricted to the secondary walls of the tracheids. The labeling density temporarily increased and then decreased in the outer and middle layers of the secondary wall during cell wall formation. This is probably due to the accumulation of lignin. In comparison with previous studies of glucuronoxylans, there must be a clear difference between the deposition of GMs and that of glucuronoxylans.

Keywords

Chamaecyparis obtusa Glucomannans Immunogold labeling Secondary wall 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yukihisa Maeda
    • 1
  • Tatsuya Awano
    • 1
  • Keiji Takabe
    • 1
  • Minoru Fujita
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Plant Cell Structure, Division of Forest and Biomaterials Science, Graduate School of AgricultureKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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