Sexuality and Disability

, Volume 4, Issue 3, pp 173–178

Sexual dysfunction in the patient with chronic back pain

  • Marie C. Infante
Articles

Abstract

Sexual dysfunction in the patient with chronic low back pain is a frequently misunderstood and neglected aspect of this disease classification. Clinical experience and a review of the literature defines three causative factors: primary organic pathology interrupting normal nervous system function; side effects of medication prescribed for the condition; and psychological factors relating to anxiety over performance and fear of pain during sexual activity. Lack of education and awareness as well as inhibitions of the patient and provider contribute to the lack of attention focused on sexual functioning in these patients. Proper recognition and management of the problem would support the overall functioning and self-concept in the large population of patients who are disabled by chronic back pain.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marie C. Infante
    • 1
  1. 1.Silver Spring

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