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Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 104, Issue 10, pp 1095–1100 | Cite as

Hormonal influences on brain ageing quality: Focus on corticotropin releasing hormone-, vasopressin- and oxytocin-immunoreactive neurones in the human brain

  • L. Calzà
  • M. Pozza
  • F. Coraddu
  • G. Farci
  • L. Giardino
Short Communications Special Issue: The Role of Limbic Telencephalic Regions in the Pathogenesis of Psychiatric Diseases of Neurodevelopmental and Neurodegenerative Origin (BMH1-CT94-1563)

Summary

In this paper we have investigated the distribution of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)-, vasopressin- and oxytocin-immunoreactive (IR) neurones in the paraventricular nucleus in the senile compared to the adult human brain. We found a higher number of CRH-IR neurones in senile compared to adult subjects. Vasopressin- and oxytocin-IR neurones were instead more weakly stained in the former compared to latter. These results support a hypothalamic involvement in promoting the higher activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and, thus, higher glucocorticoid plasma levels which have been described in the elderly.

Keywords

Corticotropin releasing hormone thyroid hormone oxytocin vasopressin neuropeptides ageing human rat brain 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Calzà
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Pozza
    • 2
  • F. Coraddu
    • 1
  • G. Farci
    • 3
  • L. Giardino
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Human PhysiologyUniversity of CagliariCagliari
  2. 2.Pathophysiology Center for the Nervous SystemHesperia HospitalModena
  3. 3.Pathology DepartmentBrotzu HospitalCagliariItaly

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