Environmentalist

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 243–254 | Cite as

Diesel particulate emissions and the implications for the soiling of buildings

  • Trudie Mansfield
  • Ron Hamilton
  • Bryan Ellis
  • Peter Newby
Article

Summary

The sources of dark smoke and particulate elemental carbon (PEC) in the London and United Kingdom atmospheres have been estimated from emission inventories. Diesels are responsible for about 60 percent of the dark smoke and 95 percent of the PEC in London, and about 30 percent of the dark smoke and 90 percent of the PEC in the UK. The role of PEC in the soiling of materials is considered. An experimental programme in the Hatfield Tunnel revealed a soiling rate constant of 1.9 yr−1. The socio-economic implications of building soiling are considered.

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Copyright information

© Science and Technology Letters 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Trudie Mansfield
    • 1
  • Ron Hamilton
    • 1
  • Bryan Ellis
    • 1
  • Peter Newby
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of the EnvironmentLondonUK

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