Environmentalist

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 101–108 | Cite as

Impact of nigerian agricultural policies on crop production and the environment

  • Gbadebo J. Osemeobo
Article
  • 125 Downloads

Summary

Nigerian efforts in agricultural development over the past three decades have failed to improve the country's economy. A review of the sector depicts a gloomy picture. Performance is reflected in environmental degradation, mounting food deficits, and decline in both gross domestic product and export earnings, while retail food prices and import bills have been increasing. These effects have further impoverished the smallholder farmers, locking them into a poverty web. The Government must seek to establish agricultural strategies which promote political stability, self reliance, public participation, sustained production and environmental security.

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Copyright information

© Science and Technology Letters 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gbadebo J. Osemeobo
    • 1
  1. 1.Garki-AbujaNigeria

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