Advertisement

Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 81–94 | Cite as

Manipulation of neurotransmitters by acupuncture (?)

A preliminary communication
  • P. Riederer
  • H. Tenk
  • H. Werner
  • J. Biscko
  • A. Rett
  • H. Krisper
Short Communications

Summary

Varying reactions of the vegetative nerve system to various point combinations (for example: vomiting, dizziness, diarrhea, urge to urinate, fatigue or drowsiness, headache), especially to the needling of Tai Chong (Li 3), induced us to perform biochemical studies before and after acupuncture treatment. A group of children and a group of adults were studied. The material studied was urine and blood; from the children, urine only. The following were determined in the urine: indolacetic acid, 5-hydroxy-indol-3-acetic acid, homovanillic acid, and vanillic-mandelic acid; in the blood, tyrosine and tryptophan (free and bound). Individual points with wide influence (He Gu=LI 4; Zu San Li=St 36; Tai Chong=Li 3) and their combination with generally effective points were tested. The needling of Tai Chong especially showed a clear increase in indolamine metabolism. Isolated increases in metabolites of catecholamine metabolism could be correlated with the patient's increased physical activity after acupuncture. Noteworthy is the observation that no significant chemical reactions were evident if local reactions to the needling no longer appeared at the end of a series of acupuncture treatments.

Keywords

Diarrhea Tryptophan Catecholamine Significant Chemical Local Reaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Anonym: The Relation between Acupuncture Analgesia and Neurotransmitters in Rabbit Brain. Chinese Medical Journal8, 105 (1973).Google Scholar
  2. Bergsmann, O.: Beziehungen zwischen Haut und Organ am Beispiel der Lunge. Vortrag, gehalten am ‚'XIII. Internationalen Akupunkturkongreß“ 1965 in Wien.Google Scholar
  3. Birkmayer, W.: Über die Korrelation von Muskeltonus und Psyche. In: Entspannung — neue therapeutische Aspekte (Kielholz, P., Hrsg.). Basel: CIBA AG. 1970.Google Scholar
  4. Birkmayer, W., andG. Pilleri: The Brainstem Reticular Formation and its Significance for Autonomic and Affective Behaviour. Basle: F. Hoffmann-La Roche & Co. Ltd. 1966.Google Scholar
  5. Bischko, J.: Die Haut im Rahmen der unspezifischen Regulation. Vortrag, gehalten am „XIII. Internationalen Akupunkturkongreß“ 1965 in Wien.Google Scholar
  6. Choh-Luh-Li: Neurologische Grundlagen des Schmerzes und ihre möglichen Beziehungen zur Akupunkturanalgesie. Akupunktur — Theorie und Praxis2, 52–62 (1973).Google Scholar
  7. Hess, S., andS. Udenfriend: A fluorometric procedure for the measurement of tryptamin in tissues. J. Pharm. Exp. Ther.127, 175–181 (1959).Google Scholar
  8. Kampik, G.: Änderung erhöhter Serumlipide durch Akupunktur. Akupunktur — Theorie und Praxis1, 24–32 (1974).Google Scholar
  9. Karoum, F., C. O. Anah, C. R. J. Ruthven, andM. Sandler: Further Observations on the Gas-Chromatographic Measurement of Urinary Phenolic and Indolic Metabolites. Clinica Chimica Acta24, 341–348 (1969).Google Scholar
  10. Kellner, G.: Bau und Funktion der Haut. Vortrag, gehalten am „XIII. Internationalen Akupunkturkongreß” 1965 in Wien.Google Scholar
  11. Neumayer, E., P. Riederer, W. Danielczyk, andD. Seemann: Biochemische Hirnbefunde bei endogener Depression. Wien. Med. Wschr.125 (21), 344–349 (1975).Google Scholar
  12. Pischinger, A.: Die Objektivierung des Sekunden-Phänomens. Österr. Z. Stowatologie60 (294), 46–51 (1963).Google Scholar
  13. Riederer, P., E. Bamberg, andW. Birkmayer: On the Determination of free L-Tryptophan. Acta Vitaminol Enzymol (in Press) 1–6.Google Scholar
  14. Riederer, P., W. Birkmayer, E. Neumayer, L. Ambrozi, andW. Linauer: The Daily Rhythm of HVA, VMA, (VA) and 5-HIAA in Depression-syndrom. Journal of Neural Transmission35, 23–45 (1974).Google Scholar
  15. Sandler, M., C. R. J. Ruthven, andL. Fellow: Personal Communication.Google Scholar
  16. Schiffter, R.: Akupunktur aus der Sicht eines kritischen Neurologen. Akupunktur — Theorie und Praxis1, 10–19 (1974).Google Scholar
  17. Small, T. J.: The Neurophysiological Basis for Acupuncture. Am. J. Acupuncture2, 77–87 (1974).Google Scholar
  18. Waalkes, T. P., andS. Udenfriend: A fluorometric method for the estimation of tyrosine in plasma and tissues. J. Lab. Clin. Med.50, 733 (1957).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Riederer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • H. Tenk
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • H. Werner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • J. Biscko
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. Rett
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • H. Krisper
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.The Ludwig Boltzmann Neurochemistry InstituteGeriatrisches Krankenhaus der Stadt Wien (Geriatrie Hospital of the City of Vienna)Austria
  2. 2.Director Prof. Dr. W. Birkmayer, together with the Ludwig Boltzmann Acupuncture InstituteVienna Policlinic HospitalAustria
  3. 3.The Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for the Research of Cerebral Lesions in ChildrenVienna-LainzAustria

Personalised recommendations