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International Journal of Biometeorology

, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 59–63 | Cite as

Solar activity cycle and the incidence of foetal chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal diagnosis

  • Gabrielle J. Halpern
  • Eliahu G. Stoupel
  • Gad Barkai
  • Rina Chaki
  • Cyril Legum
  • Moshe D. Fejgin
  • Mordechai Shohat
Original Article

Abstract

We studied 2001 foetuses during the period of minimal solar activity of solar cycle 21 and 2265 foetuses during the period of maximal solar activity of solar cycle 22, in all women aged 37 years and over who underwent free prenatal diagnosis in four hospitals in the greater Tel Aviv area. There were no significant differences in the total incidence of chromosomal abnormalities or of trisomy between the two periods (2.15% and 1.8% versus 2.34% and 2.12%, respectively). However, the trend of excessive incidence of chromosomal abnormalities in the period of maximal solar activity suggests that a prospective study in a large population would be required to rule out any possible effect of extreme solar activity.

Key words

Solar activity Chromosomal abnormality Trisomy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabrielle J. Halpern
    • 1
  • Eliahu G. Stoupel
    • 2
    • 6
  • Gad Barkai
    • 3
    • 6
  • Rina Chaki
    • 3
  • Cyril Legum
    • 4
    • 6
  • Moshe D. Fejgin
    • 5
    • 6
  • Mordechai Shohat
    • 1
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Medical GeneticsBeilinson Medical CenterPetah TiqvaIsrael
  2. 2.Division of CardiologyBeilinson Medical CenterPetah TiqvaIsrael
  3. 3.Institute of Medical GeneticsSheba Medical CenterTel HashomerIsrael
  4. 4.Genetic InstituteElias Sourasky Medical Center, Ichilov HospitalTel AvivIsrael
  5. 5.Medical Genetics Unit, Meir HospitalKfar SabaIsrael
  6. 6.The Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael

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