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Machine Vision and Applications

, Volume 6, Issue 2–3, pp 83–99 | Cite as

A graph grammar programming style for recognition of music notation

  • Hoda Fahmy
  • Dorothea Blostein
Article

Abstract

Graph grammars are a promising tool for solving picture processing problems. However, the application of graph grammars to diagram recognition has been limited to rather simple analysis of local symbol configurations. This paper introduces the Build-Weed-Incorporate programming style for graph grammars and shows its application in determining the meaning of complex diagrams, where the interaction among physically distant symbols is semantically important. Diagram recognition can be divided into two stages: symbol recognition and high-level recognition. Symbol recognition has been studied extensively in the literature. In this work we assume the existence of a symbol recognizer and use a graph grammar to assemble the diagram's information content from the symbols and their spatial relationships. The Build-Weed-Incorporate approach is demonstrated by a detailed discussion of a graph grammar for high-level recognition of music notation.

Key words

Diagram recognition Graph grammar Attributed programmed graph grammar Notational conventions Music notation Control diagram 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hoda Fahmy
    • 1
  • Dorothea Blostein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computing and Information ScienceQueen's UniversityKingstonCanada

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