Radiation and Environmental Biophysics

, Volume 29, Issue 4, pp 329–336

Decrease of the chlorophyll fluorescence ratio F690/F730 during greening and development of leaves

  • R. Hák
  • H. K. Lichtenthaler
  • U. Rinderle
Article

Summary

Using the two-wavelength chlorophyll fluorometer the fluorescence induction kinetics (Kautsky effect) were measured simultaneously in the 690 nm and 730 nm region for ten common tree species during the greening period (April to July). The chlorophyll-fluorescence ratio F690/F730 (i.e. ratio of fluorescence intensity at the two maxima near 690 and 730 nm) was calculated from the laser-induced induction kinetics (He/Ne-laser 632.8 nm) at the fluorescence maximum and the steady state. The ratio F690/F730 decreases with increasing chlorophyll content of developing leaves. Its dependence on the chlorophyll content can be fairly well expressed by a power function which has a general validity for leaves, pigment extracts and chloroplast suspensions. The ratio F690/F730 is somewhat higher at maximum (fm) than at steady-state fluorescence (fs), but there is a very good correlation between both values. The ratio F690/F730 is a good indicator of the chlorophyll content and can be used as a non-destructive measure of the chlorophyll content of leaves. It also appears to be a suitable fluorescence parameter in the future remote sensing of the physiological state of the vegetation by laser-equipped airborne systems.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Hák
    • 1
  • H. K. Lichtenthaler
    • 1
  • U. Rinderle
    • 1
  1. 1.Botanisches InstitutUniversität KarlsruheKarlsruheGermany
  2. 2.Department Plant. PhysiologyResearch Institute Crop ProductionPrague 6Czechoslovakia

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