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Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology

, Volume 119, Issue 2, pp 121–126 | Cite as

Adriamycin binding assay: a valuable chemosensitivity test in human osteosarcoma

  • Nicola Baldini
  • Katia Scotlandi
  • Massimo Serra
  • Katsuyuki Kusuzaki
  • Toshiharu Shikita
  • Maria C. Manara
  • Daniela Maurici
  • Mario Campanacci
Origial Papers Clinical Oncology

Summary

The reliability of a simple method evaluating the pattern of subcellular binding of Adriamycin (Adriamycin binding assay, ABA) as an index of sensitivity was demonstrated in different primary cultures and in sensitive and resistant cell lines of human osteosarcoma. After exposure to Adriamycin (10 μg/ml for 30 min at 37°C), living sensitive cells showed selective intranuclear uptake of the drug, whereas in resistant cells no distinct subcellular distribution was observed. The binding pattern of Adriamycin in sensitive and in highly resistant cells was inversely related to the expression of P-glycoprotein. However, low levels of resistance in vitro, not detectable by increased levels of expression of P-glycoprotein, were revealed by ABA. The use of ABA in combination with the estimate of P-glycoprotein expression is recommended in clinical practice as an accurate means for predicting the sensitivity of osteosarcoma to Adriamycin.

Key words

Adriamycin Chemosensitivity Osteosarcoma 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicola Baldini
    • 2
  • Katia Scotlandi
    • 2
  • Massimo Serra
    • 2
  • Katsuyuki Kusuzaki
    • 1
  • Toshiharu Shikita
    • 2
    • 1
  • Maria C. Manara
    • 2
  • Daniela Maurici
    • 2
  • Mario Campanacci
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Laboratorio di Ricerca OncologicaIstituti Ortopedici RizzoliBolognaItaly

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