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AI & SOCIETY

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 233–262 | Cite as

Resolving function-based conflicts in groupware systems

  • Volker Wulf
  • Volkmar Pipek
  • Andreas Pfeifer
Article

Abstract

In groupware tools, the activation of a function may affect other users who might have conflicting interests. We developed technical mechanisms to support users in resolving them. Contrary to current implementations of groupware tools, these mechanisms strengthen the position of the users who are affected by the activation of said functions. Supporting the visibility of a function's activation, and providing a channel for communication or means to intervene against the function's activation are approaches which constitute a framework to implement these mechanisms. We conclude with showing implementation examples of the framework and their evaluation in the POLITeam project.

Keywords

Conflict regulation Evaluation Field study Groupware Implementation architecture 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ProSEC, Institute for Computer Sciences IIIUniversity of BonnBonnGermany
  2. 2.Lotus Development GmbHBonnGermany

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