AI & SOCIETY

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 377–388 | Cite as

Appropriate computer-mediated communication: An Australian indigenous information system case study

  • Andrew Turk
  • Kathryn Trees
Article

Abstract

This article discusses ways to operationalise the concept of culturally appropriate computer-mediated communication, utilising information systems (IS) development methodologies and adopting a postmodern and postcolonial perspective. By way of illustration, it describes progress on the participative development of the Ieramugadu Cultural Information System. This project is designed to develop and evaluate innovative procedures for elicitation, analysis, storage and communication of indigenous cultural heritage information. It is investigating culturally appropriate IS design techniques, multimedia approaches and ways to ensure protection of secret/sacred information. Ethical issues are foregrounded.

Keywords

Communication Culture Ethics Indigenous Information systems Participative development Postcolonial Postmodern 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew Turk
    • 1
  • Kathryn Trees
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Information Technology, Division of Business, Information Technology and LawMurdoch UniversityMurdochAustralia

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