Human Ecology

, Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 111–123 | Cite as

Human rights and the environment

  • Barbara Rose Johnston
Article

Abstract

This issue of Human Ecologyfocuses on the interrelated nature of crisis in human and environmental systems and argues that the right to a healthy environment is a fundamental human right. In this article I present a conceptual framework for the “human rights and environment” special issue, followed by a brief review of significant insights offered by each contributor. Collectively the cases presented in this issue explore connections between international and national policy, government action or sanctioned action, and human environmental crises. Cultural notions are seen to play a key role in influencing social relations, legitimizing power relations, and justifying the production and reproduction of human environmental crises. And finally, these cases explore the ways in which political, economic, and cultural forces influence and at times inhibit efforts to respond to human environmental crises.

Key words

human rights and the environment environmental justice political ecology 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Rose Johnston
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Political EcologySanta Cruz

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