Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

, Volume 85, Issue 4, pp 2701–2706 | Cite as

Deterioration of copper and bronze caused by acidifying air pollutants

  • A. Reisener
  • B. Stöckle
  • R. Snethlage
Part VII Air Pollution Effects on Materials

Abstract

The ‘ICP on effects on materials’ was launched in 1985, within the framework of the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution with the aim to find an approach for clearing the main gaps in the knowledge about material degradation caused by environmental impacts. The project was organized as a staggered8 year's material exposure programme accompanied by an extensive measuring programme for environmental parameters. During the evaluation of the 4 years data set it took shape that the most efficient parameters for quantifying the material degradation are the mass loss and especially for copper the corrosion volumes. Bronze already reacts extremely sensitive on low SO2 concentrations. The starting corrosion rate for copper is suprisingly high. A strong impact of chloride on the formation of pin holes for sheltered copper could be detected without showing high mass loss. At simultanous presence of ozone the corrosive action is catalysed by it's oxidation power and leads to severe mass loss. Based upon the 4 years data set for most of the materials preliminary dose-response-functions have been prepared. For the first time a synergetic effect of SO2 and ozone has been demonstrated in a field exposure.

Key words

copper bronze field exposure material degradation. 3d roughness measurements dose-response-functions ozone sulfur dioxide 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Reisener
    • 1
  • B. Stöckle
    • 1
  • R. Snethlage
    • 1
  1. 1.Bavarian State Conservation OfficeMunichGermany

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