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Cognitive Therapy and Research

, Volume 11, Issue 5, pp 523–536 | Cite as

The cognitive side of anxiety

  • Rick E. Ingram
  • Philip C. Kendall
Article

Abstract

Building from a differentiation of the dimensions of cognition (prepostions/content, operations, products, structures), a cognitive component model of anxiety is proposed and described. The model consists of the critical psychopathological features, common psychopathological features, and error variance. Cognitive distortions are differentiated from cognitive deficiencies. Specific critical features, such as schematic content and functioning, temporal distortions, and task-irrelevant thought, are described and are considered aspects of cognitive functioning relatively specific to anxiety. Common features, such as self-absorption, automatic processing, capacity limitations, and cognitive asymmetry, are also described but are considered aspects of dysfunctional cognition associated with anxiety as well as some other related psychopathologies. Questions requiring additional research are noted.

Key words

anxiety cognitive distortions cognitive schemata cognition and psychopathology 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rick E. Ingram
    • 1
  • Philip C. Kendall
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologySan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Psychology DepartmentTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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