Acta Mechanica

, Volume 59, Issue 3–4, pp 139–155 | Cite as

Wave propagation and reflection in liquid filled distensible tube systems exhibiting dissipation and dispersion

  • T. B. Moodie
  • D. W. Barclay
Contributed Papers

Summary

In a previous paper the present authors developed a model describing wave propagation in liquid filled distensible tubes and tested it against impulse experiments involving water filled latex rubber tubes. This model incorporates both dissipative and dispersive mechanism which are absent from the commonly employed linear long wave-length (LLW) theory of haemodynamics. This higher order theory is here employed to study propagation of an impulse in a semi infinite tube, reflection of an impulse from the distal end of a finite length tube, and reflection and transmission of impulses impinging on a function connecting dissimilar liquid filled tubes. Both open and closed type reflections are treated and numerical results presented graphically. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that such a higher order theory has been employed to treat reflection and transmission of waves in tube systems.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. B. Moodie
    • 1
  • D. W. Barclay
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MathematicsUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Mathematics and StatisticsUniversity of New BrunswickFrederictonCanada

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