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Acta Mechanica

, Volume 77, Issue 3–4, pp 261–280 | Cite as

Numerical study of plane couette flow in a rotating framework

  • C. G. Speziale
  • M. B. Wilson
Contributed Papers

Summary

A numerical study of laminar plane Couette flow subjected to a steady spanwise rotation is conducted. The full nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations in a steadily rotating framework are solved by a finite difference method for a long, large-aspect-ratio rectangular channel where the outer wall moves at a constant velocity. In this manner, nonlinear and wall end effects which are present in any real laboratory Couette flow experiment are taken into account. The computations demonstrate the existence of a roll instability, at intermediate rotation rates, when the Reynolds number exceeds a critical value of 42. The associated secondary flow in the form of longitudinal rolls is shown to have a severe distortional effect on the primary axial velocity in the interior of the channel which is not linear like its counterpart in an inertial framework. Comparisons are made with previously conducted linear stability analyses as well as with other analogous numerical and experimental studies.

Keywords

Reynolds Number Finite Difference Method Axial Velocity Secondary Flow Couette Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. G. Speziale
    • 1
  • M. B. Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical EngineeringGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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