Mouse embryo quality control for toxicity determination in the Norfolk in vitro fertilization program

  • Jeanne S. McDowell
  • R. James Swanson
  • Mary Maloney
  • Lucinda Veeck
Special Contributions

Abstract

Ongoing quality control is necessary as part of the maintenance and improvement of a successful human in vitro fertilization (IVF) program. Using a mouse quality-control culture system, several instrument preparation protocols were reevaluated to determine their efficiency in the control or elimination of potential toxicity. Dilute concentrations of urine and endometrial fluid were also tested. Medium rinsed through laparoscope and aspiration needles failed to support embryo development. This effect was reversed in needles that were pretreated with rinses of Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline. Endometrial fluid demonstrated no obvious toxic effect, but urine-exposed embryos arrested in the two-cell state. The importance of periodic evaluation of materials and their pretreatment before use in in vitro fertilization of human oocytes is essential to ensure control of potentially toxic substances.

Key Words

mouse toxicity test embryo quality control 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeanne S. McDowell
    • 1
  • R. James Swanson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mary Maloney
    • 1
  • Lucinda Veeck
    • 1
  1. 1.The Howard and Georgeanna Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyEastern Virginia Medical SchoolNorfolk
  2. 2.Department of Biological SciencesOld Dominion UniversityNorfolk
  3. 3.Department of BiochemistryEastern Virginia Medical SchoolNorfolk

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