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The status of women: Conceptual and methodological issues in demographic studies

Abstract

This paper explores several conceptual problems in social demographic studies of the status of women, including failure to recognize the multidimensionality of women's status and its variation across social “locations,” the confounding of gender and class stratification systems, and the confounding of access to resources with their control. Also discussed are some generic problems in the measurement of female status, such as the sensitivity of particular indicators to social context, and the need to select consistent comparisons when judging the extent of gender inequality.

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Mason, K.O. The status of women: Conceptual and methodological issues in demographic studies. Sociol Forum 1, 284–300 (1986). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01115740

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Keywords

  • Social Context
  • Generic Problem
  • Social Issue
  • Methodological Issue
  • Gender Inequality