Applied Physics B

, Volume 63, Issue 1, pp 79–90

Simultaneous Raman/LIF measurements of major species and NO in turbulent H2/air diffusion flames

  • W. Meier
  • A. O. Vyrodov
  • V. Bergmann
  • W. Stricker
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF01112842

Cite this article as:
Meier, W., Vyrodov, A.O., Bergmann, V. et al. Appl. Phys. B (1996) 63: 79. doi:10.1007/BF01112842

Abstract

A single-pulse spontaneous Raman scattering apparatus, based on a flashlamp-pumped dye laser, was used to determine the concentrations of the major species and the temperature in turbulent H2/N2/air jet diffusion flames. The concentrations of nitric oxide were simultaneously measured by Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) after excitation of theA2Σ+X2Π transition with a Nd: YAG-pumped dye laser. Some fundamentals of the employed methods, including the calibration procedure, quenching corrections, and accuracy are discussed. Besides a detailed study of the experimental technique, a main goal of the presented investigations was the generation of comprehensive data sets of high accuracy from well-defined turbulent flames which allow for a quantitative comparison with model calculations. Two flames with different fuel dilution and Reynolds numbers were investigated in a pattern of typically 100 measuring locations each comprising 300 single shots. In addition, four flames with different flow velocities but same fuel composition were compared with respect to their temperature and NO concentration profiles. The results show that differential diffusion plays an important role in these flames, especially near the flame base, where the temperature is increased above the adiabatic flame temperature and deviations from adiabatic equilibrium are large. The correlations between NO and mixture fraction and NO and temperature reveal characteristic features of the different flames.

PACS

78.30 82.80 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Meier
    • 1
  • A. O. Vyrodov
    • 1
  • V. Bergmann
    • 1
  • W. Stricker
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Physikalische Chemie der VerbrennungDLR StuttgartStuttgartGermany

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