Fertilizer research

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 127–131

Chelates in agriculture

  • D. F. Clemens
  • B. M. Whitehurst
  • G. B. Whitehurst
Article

Abstract

Within the past 20–25 years it has been recognized that many of the micronutrient requirements of plants could be supplied by complexes containing chelated metals. These chelates find uses in a wide variety of agricultural crops such as: corn, bush beans, cucumbers and citrus groves. Applications vary from fertilizer additives and seed dressing to foliar sprays and hydroponics. The chelates themselves have chemical structures that seem to be limited only by the chemists imagination. The critical factors for the use of any of these chelates is the stability constant and the cost to prepare a pound of chelated metal such as iron or zinc. A comparison of costs for a few of the more common chelates indicates a need for agricultural studies on the results of using glucoheptonates for supplying micronutrients.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Werner A (1893) Anorg U Allgem Chem 3: 267Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Morgan GT and Drew HDK (1920) J Chem Soc 117: 1456Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Jacobson L (1951) Plant Physiol 26: 411Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Weast RC (1985) ‘Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. 65th ed CRC Press, Cleveland, OhioGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Martell AE and Smith RM Critical Stability Constants. Plenum Press, New York, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Gonzalez Velasco J, Ortega J and Sancho J (1975) J An Quim 71: 706Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    (a) Wallace A (1971) A Decade of Synthetic Chelating Agents in Inorganic Plant Nutrition. Edwards Brothers, Inc. Ann Arbor, Michigan (b) Wallace A (1971) Regulation of the Micronutrient Status of Plants by Chelating Agents and Other Factors. Edwards Brothers, Inc Ann Arbor, Michigan (c) Wallace A (1983) A One-Decade Update on Chelated Metals for Supplying Micronutrients to Crops. J Plant Nutr 6(6): 429Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Whistler RL and Chen C (1987) Unpublished Article. Department of Biochemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IndianaGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Holstein AG (1960) Unpublished Report. Pfanstiehl Laboratories, Inc. Waukegan, IllinoisGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Shishniashvili ME, Goguadze MI and Khorlin A Ya (1974) Khelaty Met Prir Soedin Ikh Primen. 1: 26; Chem Abstr 1976, 84: 74545nGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Gray KR (1980) US Patent 4181516Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Chem Eng News (1983) 61: 451Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. F. Clemens
    • 1
  • B. M. Whitehurst
    • 2
  • G. B. Whitehurst
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryEast Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA
  2. 2.Whitehurst AssociatesNew BernUSA

Personalised recommendations