Plant Foods for Human Nutrition

, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 201–208 | Cite as

Nutrient composition and protein quality of minor millets

  • Pasala Geervani
  • Bjorn O. Eggum

Abstract

Nutrient composition of five minor millets produced and consumed in dry land regions and tribal areas of Andhra Pradesh, India, was evaluated. The millets analysed were Italian millet (Setaria Italica), French millet (Panicum miliaceum), Barnyard millet (Echinachloa colona), Kodo millet (Paspalum scrobiculatum) and little millet (Panicum miliare). The nutrients analysed were proximate principles, amino acids, fibre components, calcium, Phosphorus and Iron. Protein and energy were evaluated by true digestability (TD), biological value (BV), net protein utilization (NPU) and digestible energy (DE) in rats. The protein content was higher and lysine content lower, when compared to major millets. Dehusked millets had lower total dietary fibre (TDF) and tannin. The TD of protein ranged between 95.0 to 99.3, whereas the BV was between 48.3 and 56.5. All the millets were poor sources of calcium, phosphorus and iron, with the exception of french millet.

Key words

minor millets nutrient composition protein quality 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Adoracion PR, Juliano BO, Tanaka Y (1979) Nutrient content and distribution in milling fractions of rice grain. J Sci Food Agric 30: 475–481PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Asp NG, Johansson CG, Hallmer H, Siljestrom M (1983) Rapid enzymatic assay of insoluble and soluble dietary fibre. J Agric Food Chem 31: 476–482PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    AOAC (1975) Official methods of analysis, 11th edn. Washington DC: Association of Official Analytical ChemistsGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bach Knudsen KE, Aman P, Eggum BO (1987) Cereal Sci (In press)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Deosthale YA (1980) Nutrition dimension of high yielding and hybrid crop varieties; locational and varietal differences in nutritive value. Proceedings of the workshop on strategies in agriculture sector for nutritional goals. ICAR/UNICEF/NIN, pp. 26–40Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Eggum BO (1973) A study of certain factors influencing protein utilization in rats and pigs. Copenhagen: Beretn. 406 National Institute of Animal Science, p. 173Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Eggum BO, Christensen KD (1975) Influence of tannin on protein utilization in feedstuffs with special reference to barley. In: Breeding for seed protein improvement using nuclear techniques. Vienna: International Atomic Energy Agency, pp. 135–143Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Gopalan C, Ramsastri BV, Balasubramanian SC (1980) Nutritive value of Indian foods, National Institute of Nutrition, ICMR, IndiaGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Jambunathan R (1980) Improvement of the nutritional quality of sorghum and pearl millet. Fd Nutr Bull 2, 1: 11–16Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kamath MV, Belavady R (1980) Unavailable carbohydrates of commonly consumed Indian foods. J Sci Fd Agric 31: 194–202Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Khan MA, Eggum BO (1978) Effect of baking on the nutritive value of Pakistani-bread. J Sci Fd Agric 29: 1069–1075Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Mason VC, Bech-Anderson S, Rudemo M (1980) Hydrolysate preparation for amino acid determinations in feed constituents. Z Tierphysiol Tierernahrg U Futtermittelkde 43: 146–164Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    NIN (1983) A manual of laboratory techniques. Raghuramulu N, Nair KM, Kalyanasundaram S (eds), NIN, Indian Council Med. Res, Hyderabad, India, p. 278Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Stoldt W (1952) Vorschlag Zur Vereinheitlichung der Fettbestimmung in Lebensmitteln Fette and Seifen 54: 206–207Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Stuffins CB (1967) The determination of phosphate and calcium in food stuffs. Analyst 92: 107–111PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Weidner K, Jacobsen PE (1962) Dyrefysiologi II. Ovelsesvejledning for landbrugs og mejeristuderence ved Den kgl. Veterinaer og Landbohojskole (Da) DSR Forlag, Copenhagen, p. 118Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pasala Geervani
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bjorn O. Eggum
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.National Institute of Animal Science, Animal Physiology and Biochemistry, Forsogsanlaeg FoulumOrum SdnlDenmark
  2. 2.A.P. Agricultural University, RajendranagarHyderabadIndia

Personalised recommendations