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Few-Body Systems

, Volume 9, Issue 2–3, pp 41–56 | Cite as

Michael J. Moravcsik: A biographical sketch

  • G. R. Goldstein
Original Papers

Abstract

A brief biography of Michael J. Moravcsik is presented, concentrating on the chronology of his contributions to theoretical high- and intermediateenergy physics. The evolution of his interest in science development in the third world, scientific methodology, and scientometrics are indicated. A personal reminiscence is included.

Keywords

Elementary Particle Science Development Scientific Methodology Biographical Sketch Personal Reminiscence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Goldstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsTufts UniversityMedfordUSA

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