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Plant Foods for Human Nutrition

, Volume 45, Issue 1, pp 91–95 | Cite as

Resistant starch content of Indian foods

  • K. Platel
  • K. S. Shurpalekar
Article

Abstract

Resistant starch (RS) was determined in a few selected cereals, legumes and vegetables after processing. Higher RS contents were observed in foods subjected to dry heat treatment compared to wet processed ones. Among the foods studied, sorghum, green gram dhal, and green plantain showed relatively higher RS content. Based on the RS content thus determined in individual foods and the known composition of the Indian diet, RS content of Indian diets were computed.

Key words

Resistant starch Processed foods Dietary fibre Indian diets 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Platel
    • 1
  • K. S. Shurpalekar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Nutrition and Food SafetyCentral Food Technological Research InstituteMysoreIndia

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