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Plant Systematics and Evolution

, Volume 218, Issue 3–4, pp 205–219 | Cite as

Phylogenetic relationships in the Hamamelidaceae: Evidence from the nucleotide sequences of the plastid genematK

  • Jianhua Li
  • A. Linn Bogle
  • Anita S. Klein
Article

Abstract

The Hamamelidaceae is a family that bridges the basal elements of the Rosidae and the “lower” Hamamelidae, thus a better understanding of the phylogeny of the family is important for clarifying evolutionary patterns in the diversification of eudicots. However, subfamilial as well as tribal relationships in the Hamamelidaceae have been controversial. Nucleotide sequences of the chloroplast genematK were used to study the intergeneric relationships of the family. In the phylogenetic trees, constructed using parsimony analysis, the clade containingAltingia andLiquidambar (Altingioideae) is sister to a clade that includes all other Hamamelidaceae.Exbucklandia andRhodoleia form a clade, suggesting a close relationship between the two genera.Disanthus is sister to the monophyletic Hamamelidoideae. The paraphyletic arrangement ofDisanthus, Mytilaria andExbucklandia with respect to the Hamamelidoideae does not support the combination of these genera in one subfamily. In the Hamamelidoideae, thematK phylogeny supports the monophyly of several previously recognized groups with modifications, including the tribes Eustigmateae (incl.Molinadendron), Fothergilleae (excl.Molinadendron andMatudaea), and the subtribe Dicoryphinae. However, the Hamamelideae as traditionally circumscribed is polyphyletic. Apetaly has evolved three times independently in the Hamamelidoideae.

Key words

Hamamelidaceae Phylogeny matK gene 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jianhua Li
    • 1
  • A. Linn Bogle
    • 2
  • Anita S. Klein
    • 3
  1. 1.Arnold Arboretum of Harvard UniversityJamaica PlainUSA
  2. 2.Department of Plant BiologyUniversity of New HampshireDurhamUSA
  3. 3.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyUniversity of New HampshireDurhamUSA

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