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Chemical composition of two semi-aquatic plants for food use

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Abstract

The seasonal variation in the nutrient composition ofEnhydra fluctuans andMarsilea quadrifolia, two edible semi-aquatic plants, was studied in order to promote their consumption as green leafy vegetables. Both plants had a high crude protein content throughout all harvesting seasons.Enhydra fluctuans had a low ash content and was a good source of β-carotene (3.7 to 4.2 mg/100 g on a fresh weight basis).Marsilea quadrifolia exhibited wide fluctuations between seasons and was not very promising in nutrient composition when compared to other commonly used green leafy vegetables.

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Dewanji, A., Matai, S., Si, L. et al. Chemical composition of two semi-aquatic plants for food use. Plant Food Hum Nutr 44, 11–16 (1993). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01088478

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Key words

  • Chemical composition
  • Enhydra fluctuans
  • Marsilea quadrifolia
  • Seasonal variation