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Plant Foods for Human Nutrition

, Volume 43, Issue 1, pp 1–7 | Cite as

Utilization of β-carotene fromSpirulina platensis by rats

  • Rashmi Kapoor
  • Usha Mehta
Article

Abstract

The availability of β-carotene from Spirulina as compared to standard all trans β-carotene was studied by the liver and kidney vitamin A storage method. After 21 days of vitamin A depletion, the rats were repleted with β-carotene from Spirulina and a standard source at two dietary levels (60 and 120 µg/day) for a 10 day period. At lower levels, the liver storage levels of vitamin A and the percent of β-carotene absorption were comparable to those of the standard. At higher levels both these parameters of the Spirulina fed group were significantly (P<0.01) inferior to the standard source fed group. However, the Spirulina fed group showed better (P<0.05) growth than the standard fed group did at both low and high levels of feeding.

Key words

β-carotene Spirulina platensis β-carotene availability blue green algae 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rashmi Kapoor
    • 1
  • Usha Mehta
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Foods & NutritionHaryana Agricultural UniversityHisarIndia

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