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Shared labor and love

Job-sharing couples in academia

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Abstract

The study on job sharing couples and employers in academia found that, for the couples, the shared and flexible work schedule is conducive to increased cooperation and sharing of work and domestic-related activities, independent of gender, and to enhanced intimacy. Because of how the couples use their “surplus” time, they are working more, not less. Employers recognize the increased productivity, but tend to attribute it to their special couple(s) and not to the alternative work structure. Many employers resist job sharing because part-time work is not considered professional.

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References

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Arkin, W., Dobrofsky, L.R. Shared labor and love. J Fam Econ Iss 1, 492–512 (1978). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01083435

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Keywords

  • Social Policy
  • Social Issue
  • Work Schedule
  • Flexible Work
  • Work Structure