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Institutional goals: Their impact on adult learners

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Abstract

A research study of Sinclair's College Without Walls program for adult students was recently conducted through the University of Cincinnati using the Educational Testing Service's “Community College Goals Inventory.” A control group of approximately 100 students enrolled in a traditional program (randomly selected) was compared with an experimental group of approximately 100 College Without Walls students. Statistically, College Without Walls students expressed significantly greater satisfaction with the accomplishment of numerous institutional goals than did their traditional student counterparts. There were no other statistically significant differences in this comparison of two groups on a myriad of other factors from career preparation to institutional environment.

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References

  1. Gross, R.The Lifelong Learner. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1977.

  2. Houle, C.The Design of Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1972.

  3. Rogers, C.Freedom to Learn. Columbus, Ohio: Merrill, 1969.

  4. Tough, A.Major Learning Efforts: Recent Research and Future Directions. Toronto: Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, 1977.

  5. Vinson, K.Students' Expectations of and Satisfaction with Institutional Goals in External and Conventional Degree Programs in a Community College. Ann Arbor: University Microfilms International, 1980.

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Vinson, K. Institutional goals: Their impact on adult learners. Alternative Higher Education 7, 52–56 (1982). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01080810

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Keywords

  • Social Psychology
  • Research Study
  • Community College
  • Institutional Environment
  • Cross Cultural Psychology