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Social Indicators Research

, Volume 30, Issue 2–3, pp 197–228 | Cite as

Guidelines for time use data collection

  • Andrew S. Harvey
Article

Abstract

Growing and widespread interest in time begs the need for time use data collection and reporting standards. Initial guidance for comparative work was provided by the Multinational Time Use Project. However, changing technologies, methodologies, and divergent data needs have given rise to the need for updated guidance. This paper, prepared with input from members of the International Association for Time Use Research, examines the history and applications of time use data, identifies and evaluates methodological options for time use studies, recommends options facilitating cross-national and cross-temporal comparability and identifies methodological challenges facing time use researchers. The study concludes that alternative collection methods appear to make little difference in the resulting activity and time use estimates at customary levels of reporting.

Keywords

Data Collection Collection Method International Association Methodological Challenge Reporting Standard 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew S. Harvey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsSaint Mary's UniversityHalifaxCanada

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