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Psychiatric Quarterly

, Volume 55, Issue 4, pp 272–274 | Cite as

Magical thinking by inpatient staff members

  • Wilfrid L. Pilette
Commentary

Abstract

Magical thinking is a primitve form of mental activity which, nevertheless, the author contends, is common among mental health professionals. Four examples of magical thinking by inpatient staff members are presented and briefly explored, in order to shed light on our work and ourselves.

Keywords

Public Health Mental Health Health Professional Staff Member Mental Health Professional 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    Linn L: Clinical manifestations of psychiatric disorders. In Friedman AM, Kaplan HI, Sadock BJ (eds):Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry, vol. 1, 2nd edition, Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, 1975, pp. 783–826.Google Scholar
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    Nemiah JC: Obsessive-compulsive neurosis. In Friedman AM, Kaplan HI, Sadock BJ (eds.):Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry, vol. 1, 2nd edition, Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, 1975, pp. 1241–1255.Google Scholar
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    Pines A, Maslach C: Characteristics of staff burnout in mental health settings.Hosp & Comm Psychiat 29233–237, 1978.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wilfrid L. Pilette
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.North Central UnitWorcester State HospitalWorcester
  2. 2.University of Massachusetts School of MedicineWorcester

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