Population Research and Policy Review

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 3–26

The influence of rural-urban migration on migrants' fertility in Korea, Mexico and Cameroon

  • Bun Song Lee
  • Louis G. Pol
Article

Abstract

The paper presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between rural-urban migration and fertility in Korea, Mexico, and Cameroon. Using an autoregressive model, the results show a significant rural-urban migration adaptation effect in Korea and Mexico, a reduction of 2.57 and 1.45 children during the entire childbearing period, respectively, when compared to a rural stayer, even after the effect of selection has been controlled. Rural-urban migration has a very small impact on fertility in Cameroon. The unexpected result for Cameroon is due to the fact that the fertility-increasing effect of urban residency on the improved supply conditions of births, such as reduced infertility, offsets the fertility-depressing effect of urban residency on the demand for births. As a result of the adaptation to urban fertility norms, the number of country-wide births was reduced significantly in Mexico and Korea over the time periods studied.

Keywords

Fertility adaptation Fertility level Rural-urban migration 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bun Song Lee
    • 1
  • Louis G. Pol
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsUniversity of Nebraska at OmahaOmahaUSA
  2. 2.Department of MarketingUniversity of Nebraska at OmahaOmahaUSA

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