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The American Journal of Digestive Diseases

, Volume 19, Issue 2, pp 93–99 | Cite as

Electrical and contractile activities of the small intestine of the cat

  • Norman W. Weisbrodt
Original Articles

Abstract

Five conscious cats were studied in the fasted and fed states to characterize the electrical and contractile activities of the feline small intestine. Slow waves were present at a frequency which decreased from 18 cycles/min in the duodenum to 13 cycles/min in the terminal ileum. There was a frequency “plateau” over the proximal 40 to 60% of intestine where the slow waves were coupled. Spike potentials of 2 types were present. The majority of spikes occurred only during the depolarization phase of the slow waves and were accompanied by phasic contractions. The second type of spiking (occurring only in fasted animals) was characterized by a 4-to 16-second prolonged burst of spike potentials that first appeared in the upper small bowel and spread aborally. This burst was accompanied by a large tonic contraction. The slow waves were disrupted by the prolonged burst. These experiments not only demonstrate that the small intestine of the cat exhibits many of the same electrical and mechanical activities present in other species but also that a seemingly unique activity is present.

Keywords

Public Health Small Intestine Small Bowel Mechanical Activity Slow Wave 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Digestive Disease Systems, Inc. 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman W. Weisbrodt
    • 1
  1. 1.Program in PhysiologyThe University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Texas Medical CenterHouston

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