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The American Journal of Digestive Diseases

, Volume 21, Issue 11, pp 953–956 | Cite as

Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux: Incidence and precipitating factors

  • Otto T. Nebel
  • Michael F. Fornes
  • Donald O. Castell
Original Articles

Abstract

The incidence and precipitating factors associated with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux were evaluated by a questionnaire in 446 hospitalized and 558 nonhospitalized subjects. Of 385 control subjects 7% experienced heartburn daily, 14% noted heartburn weekly, and 15% experienced it once a month, giving a total of 36% of subjects having heartburn at least monthly. Daily heartburn occurred at a significantly greater (P<0.05) rate for 246 medical inpatients (14%) and for 121 patients seen in outpatient gastroenterological clinic (15%). Pregnant women seen in uncomplicated obstetrical clinic had symptoms of significantly greater (P<0.01) incidence: daily (25%) and at least once monthly (52%). Age, sex, or hospitalization did not significantly affect incidence. Fried foods, “spicy” foods, and alcohol were the most common precipitating factors.

Keywords

Public Health Alcohol Pregnant Woman Control Subject Gastroesophageal Reflux 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
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Copyright information

© Digestive Disease Systems, Inc. 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Otto T. Nebel
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael F. Fornes
    • 1
    • 2
  • Donald O. Castell
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Gastroenterology Division, Internal Medicine Service and Clinical Investigation CenterNaval Regional Medical CenterSan Diego
  2. 2.National Naval Medical CenterBethesda

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