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Of the shared responsibility for civil commitment

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Abstract

Procedures and standards for civil commitment of the mentally ill have undergone significant changes in recent years. A part of the reason for this phenomenon has been legal activism, and its challenges to psychiatry. This article examines the vicissitudes of the relationships between mental health professionals and attorneys, with particular reference to the impact on involuntary hospitalization. It is the author's position that active collaboration between disciplines with varying perspectives is both necessary and desirable, but that lawyers should develop a method of sharing accountability for the outcome of their interventions.

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Rachlin, S. Of the shared responsibility for civil commitment. Psych Quart 54, 38–42 (1982). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF01064727

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Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Mental Health
  • Health Professional
  • Mental Health Professional
  • Legal Activism