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Journal of the History of Biology

, Volume 26, Issue 1, pp 1–38 | Cite as

On the road to the Origin with Darwin, Hooker, and Gray

  • Duncan M. Porter
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Duncan M. Porter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburg

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