Public Choice

, Volume 78, Issue 2, pp 145–154 | Cite as

A comparison of incumbent security in the House and Senate

  • Kenneth Collier
  • Michael Munger
Article

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth Collier
    • 1
  • Michael Munger
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of KansasLawrence
  2. 2.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of North CarolinaChapel Hill

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