Public Choice

, Volume 85, Issue 1–2, pp 1–10

The influence of state-level economic conditions on the 1992 U.S. presidential election

  • Burton A. Abrams
  • James L. Butkiewicz
Article

Abstract

Evidence is found that state-level economic conditions played a significant role in the defeat of George Bush in the 1992 U.S. presidential election. Evidence is also found which indicates that the entrance of Ross Perot into the race as an independent candidate was not instrumental in the Bush loss.

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Burton A. Abrams
    • 1
  • James L. Butkiewicz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsUniversity of DelawareNewark

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