Hyperserotoninemia and antiserotonin antibodies in autism and other disorders

  • Arthur Yuwiler
  • Jean Chen Shih
  • Chong-Hong Chen
  • Edward R. Ritvo
  • G. Hanna
  • G. W. Ellison
  • B. H. King
Article

Abstract

This study examined the linkage between elevated blood serotonin in autism and the presence of circulating autoantibodies agianst the serotonin 5HT1A receptor. Information was also obtained on the diagnostic and receptor specificity of these autoantibodies. Blood serotonin was measured as was inhibition of serotonin binding to human cortical membranes by antibody-rich fractions of blood from controls and from patients with childhood autism, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette's, and multiple sclerosis. The results showed elevated blood serotonin was not closely related to inhibition of serotonin binding by antibody-rich blood fractions. Inhibition of binding was highest for patients with multiple sclerosis and was not specific to the 5HT1A receptor as currently defined. Although inhibition was not specific to autism, the data were insufficient to establish if people with autism differed from normal controls on this measure.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur Yuwiler
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jean Chen Shih
    • 3
  • Chong-Hong Chen
    • 4
  • Edward R. Ritvo
    • 1
  • G. Hanna
    • 1
  • G. W. Ellison
    • 1
  • B. H. King
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California-Los Angeles-School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Neurobiochemistry Laboratory T-85West Los Angeles Veterans Administration Medical Center, Brentwood DivisionLos Angeles
  3. 3.School of PharmacyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaUSA
  4. 4.School of PharmacyUniversity of Southern California and Anhui Medical UniversityHefie, AnhuiPeople's Republic of China

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