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A follow-up study of early onset psychosis: Comparison between outcome diagnoses of schizophrenia, mood disorders, and personality disorders

  • Jon M. McClellan
  • John S. Werry
  • Mark Ham
Article

Abstract

This study examined the outcome of youth previously diagnosed with psychotic disorders at a public-sector tertiary care hospital. Of 95 children and adolescents retrospectively identified, follow-up information (mean interval 3.9 years) was obtained on 24 subjects with an outcome diagnosis of schizophrenia, 9 with psychotic mood disorders, 5 with personality disorders (antisocial or borderline), and 1 with schizo-affective disorder. The schizophrenic group was more often odd premorbidly and functioned worse at outcome, while the mood-disordered group had a shorter follow-up period and was more often anxious or dysthymic premorbidly. The personality-disordered group resembled the schizophrenics in their degree of impairment and chronicity. All three groups had high rates of family disruption, low SES, substance abuse, and chronicity, and were similar in their degree of premorbid impairment, length of prodrome, age of onset, initial diagnosis, and family psychiatric history. Misdiagnosis at onset was quite common and highlights the need for systematic longitudinal assessment of early onset psychotic disorders.

Keywords

Schizophrenia Substance Abuse Mood Disorder Personality Disorder Psychotic Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jon M. McClellan
    • 3
  • John S. Werry
    • 1
  • Mark Ham
    • 2
  1. 1.University of AucklandAuckland
  2. 2.The Human Development CenterDuluth
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry, RP-10University of WashingtonSeattle

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