Fire Technology

, Volume 23, Issue 4, pp 280–291 | Cite as

Physiological aspects of fire fighting

  • Paul O. Davis
  • Charles O. Dotson
Article

Abstract

The conditions and requirements of the fire fighter and the unusual demands of fire fighting activities have received increased attention since the early 1970s. Other industries usually design physical performance requirements around the capabilities of the worker, but the fire fighter must respond to the constraints and requirements of the emergency. Recent research and its relationship to a fire fighter's physical profile are described and discussed.

Key words

Ergonomics fire fighter physical fitness aerobics 

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Copyright information

© National Fire Protection Association 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul O. Davis
    • 1
  • Charles O. Dotson
    • 1
  1. 1.Applied Research AssociatesBurtonsvilleUSA

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