Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics

, Volume 49, Issue 1–4, pp 69–91

A comprehensive meteorological modeling system—RAMS

  • R. A. Pielke
  • W. R. Cotton
  • R. L. Walko
  • C. J. Tremback
  • W. A. Lyons
  • L. D. Grasso
  • M. E. Nicholls
  • M. D. Moran
  • D. A. Wesley
  • T. J. Lee
  • J. H. Copeland
Article

Summary

This paper presents a range of applications of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), a comprehensive mesoscale meterological modeling system. Applications discussed in this paper include large eddy simulations (LES) and simulations of thunderstorms, cumulus fields, mesoscale convective systems, mid-latitude cirrus clouds, winter storms, mechanically- and thermally-forced mesoscale systems, and mesoscale atmospheric disperision. A summary of current RAMS options is also presented. Improvements to RAMS currently underway include refinements to the cloud radiation, cloud microphysics, cumulus, and surface soil/vegetative parameterization schemes, the parallelization of the code, development of a more versatile visualization capability, and research into meso-α-scale cumulus parameterization.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Pielke
    • 1
  • W. R. Cotton
    • 1
  • R. L. Walko
    • 1
  • C. J. Tremback
    • 1
  • W. A. Lyons
    • 1
  • L. D. Grasso
    • 1
  • M. E. Nicholls
    • 1
  • M. D. Moran
    • 1
  • D. A. Wesley
    • 1
  • T. J. Lee
    • 1
  • J. H. Copeland
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Atmospheric ScienceColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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