Journal of Protein Chemistry

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 45–50

Specific peptide-bond cleavage by microwave irradiation in weak acid solution

  • Chi-Yue Wu
  • Shui-Tein Chen
  • Shyh-Horng Chiou
  • Kung-Tsung Wang
Article

Abstract

A rapid and selective peptide-bond cleavage in weak acid, induced by microwave irradiation, has been developed. The specific cleavage sites of peptide bonds located only at the carboxyl-and amino-terminal ends of aspartyl residues along the peptide chain. A systematic study including the time course for the cleavage of various aspartyl-containing peptides, the effect of the acidity of the reaction solution on the completeness of peptide-bond cleavage, and the relationship between the power of microwave irradiation and the reaction time of cleavage are studied.

Key words

Specific cleavage peptide hydrolysis microwave irradiation rate enhancement weak acid hydrolysis aspartyl residues 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chi-Yue Wu
    • 1
  • Shui-Tein Chen
    • 1
  • Shyh-Horng Chiou
    • 1
  • Kung-Tsung Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Biochemical SciencesNational Taiwan University and Institute of Biological Chemistry, Academia SinicaTaipeiTaiwan

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