Advertisement

Biotechnology Letters

, Volume 12, Issue 11, pp 793–798 | Cite as

Production of rosmarinic acid in high density perfusion cultures ofAnchusa officinalis using a high sugar medium

  • Wei-Wen Su
  • Arthur E. Humphrey
Article

Summary

The most direct approach to enhancing the volumetric yield of secondary metabolites in plant tissue cultures is to operate the culture under high cell density. In this study, a cell suspension ofAnchusa officinalis was cultivated using a semi-continuous perfusion technique, i.e. batch cultivation with intermittent medium exchange. Using a perfusion medium containing sucrose concentration which was two times that in the normal growth medium, the final cell density and the final product concentration were increased by more than 2-fold compared with a batch culture without medium exchange. The high cell density obtained from the semi-continuous perfusion culture can be explained by the prevention of nutrient depletion, removal of toxic by-products, as well as the control of cell size by virtue of the high sugar medium osmolarity.

Keywords

Medium Exchange Sucrose Concentration High Cell Density Plant Tissue Culture Rosmarinic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. P. V. Ammirato and D. J. Styer. Strategies for large-scale manipulation of somatic embryos in suspension culture. InBiotechnology in Plant Science. New York: Academic Press, 1985.Google Scholar
  2. Y. Fujita. Industrial production of shikonin and berberine. InApplications of plant cell and tissue culture. New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1988.Google Scholar
  3. O. L. Gamborg and D. E. Eveleigh. Culture methods and detection of glucanases in suspension cultures of wheat and barley.Can. J. Biochem., 1968,46, 417–421.Google Scholar
  4. P. C. Hiemenz.Principles of colloid and surface chemistry. New York: M. Dekker, 1977.Google Scholar
  5. C. Y. Hu and P. J. Wang. Meristem, shoot tip and bud cultures. InHandbook of plant cell culture. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co., 1983.Google Scholar
  6. A. Pareilleux and R. Vinas. A study on the alkaloid production by resting cell suspensions ofCatharanthus roseus in a continuous flow reactor.Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 1984,19, 316–320.Google Scholar
  7. T. Stonier. The role of auxin protectors in autonomous growth. InLes Cultures de Tissue de Plantes. Paris: Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1971.Google Scholar
  8. W. W. Su and A. E. Humphrey. Bubble-free aeration for high density plant cell cultures. Submitted for publication, 1990.Google Scholar
  9. H. Tanaka. Oxygen transfer in broths of plant cells at high density.Biotechnol. Bioeng., 1982,24, 425–442.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wei-Wen Su
    • 1
  • Arthur E. Humphrey
    • 1
  1. 1.BioProcessing Institute Department of Chemical EngineeringLehigh UniversityUSA

Personalised recommendations