Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 71–83

Musk deer (Moschus moschiferus): Reinvestigation of main lipid components from preputial gland secretion

  • V. E. Sokolov
  • M. Z. Kagan
  • V. S. Vasilieva
  • V. I. Prihodko
  • E. P. Zinkevich
Article

Abstract

The qualitative and quantitative composition of the principal lipid constituents of Siberian musk deer (Moschus moschiferus) preputial gland secretion, main odor carriers and potential precursors of odorous substances, was investigated by means of high-performance liquid chromatography. Free fatty acids and phenols (10%), waxes (38%), and steroids (38%) were found to be the main groups of the secretion lipids. Cholestanol (I), cholesterol (II), androsterone (III), Δ4-3α-hydroxy-17-ketoandrostene (IV), 5β, 3α-hydroxy-17-ketoandrostane (V), 5α, 3β, 17α-dihydroxyandrostane (VI), 5β, 3α, 17β-dihydroxyandrostane (VII), and 5β, 3α, 17α-dihydroxyandrostane (VIII) were isolated from the steroid fraction and their structures confirmed by IR, PMR, and mass spectra. 3-Methylpentadecanone (muscone) was not identified among the secretion lipids. Preputial gland secretion stimulated sex behavior of musk deer females.

Key words

Musk deer Moschus moschiferus preputial gland chemical composition secretion androgens odor androsterone steroids muscone pheromone 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. E. Sokolov
    • 1
  • M. Z. Kagan
    • 1
  • V. S. Vasilieva
    • 1
  • V. I. Prihodko
    • 1
  • E. P. Zinkevich
    • 1
  1. 1.A.N. Severtzov Institute of Evolutionary Animal Morphology and EcologyU.S.S.R. Academy of SciencesMoscowUSSR

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