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Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 1–27 | Cite as

Particle dynamics and particle heat and mass transfer in thermal plasmas. Part III. Thermal plasma jet reactors and multiparticle injection

  • Y. C. Lee
  • E. Pfender
Article

Abstract

Thermal plasma processing involves complex interactions of particulates with plasmas. In previous studies (see Parts I and II of this series), an assessment of different effects has been made considering the dynamics and heat and mass transfer of a single particle immersed into a thermal plasma. The last paper of this sequence is concerned with the simulation of thermal plasma jet reactors and the effects caused by multiparticle injection.

A mathematical model is proposed for the simulation of thermal plasma jet reactors, including the mixing phenomena between the jet and the surrounding gases by generalizing the governing equations for simple mixing flows. Also included is the density fluctuation effect by extending the K-ɛ model to a four-equation turbulence model combined with a probability density function. This model is internally consistent covering additional physical phenomena which are not covered by existing models. Unfortunately, its expected higher accuracy cannot be proven because of the present uncertainties associated with the input.

For multiparticle injection, the simulation repeats calculations for single-particle injection, but with different initial conditions correcting the solutions by considering the coupling effects between particles and the plasma.

The results indicate that (i) thermal plasmas show different mixing behavior in different gases; (ii) the density fluctuation effect is important since it causes large differences between the mass-weighted and unweighted time-averaged temperatures of thermal plasma jets; (iii) coupling effects become important when the particle loading rate exceeds half of the plasma mass flow rate; (iv) there are 16 constraints imposed on the modeling work which have to be considered for establishing a base for comparison with future experimental studies.

Key Words

Turbulent plasma jets multiparticle injection modeling work 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. C. Lee
    • 1
  • E. Pfender
    • 1
  1. 1.Heat Transfer Division, Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolis

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